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Profile On: Vanessa Hughes, Lady Photographic

Vanessa Hughes of Lady Photographic has kindly answered some questions about her work as a freelance photographer and videographer.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
This is hard to say. I’m a workaholic so I spend every waking hour shooting, editing, social media marketing, or dreaming up future projects related to horses. 50% photography/video 50% horses.

A Polo Shot by Vanessa Hughes of Lady Photographic

A Polo Shot by Vanessa Hughes of Lady Photographic

What is it exactly that you do?
I work as a freelance photographer and videographer. I do everything from show photography, covering events for magazines, promotional videos, with some graphic design and social media work thrown in.

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
Sure, it is definitely possible, but it isn’t easy. It’s certainly not for the faint of heart. You need to be understanding of your financial limitations.

You have to love it, because there will be days when you don’t know how you’re going to manage to pay rent. Task one is learning how to suck up your pride and take other less glamorous side jobs during lean times. Right now I work as freelance. In the future that will change once I pick up something permanent, but for now I am enjoying the freedom.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
There are no general steps to getting into the business. Some of it is luck and who you know, the rest is dedication and being willing to put in a lot of long hours and hard work.

The most valuable pieces of advice I can give to someone trying to enter this field: Know your rights. NEVER let anyone tell you, you do not deserve to be paid. If you did the work and they profited from it, they are obligated to pay you.

Avoid people who shower you with compliments, but get quiet when you mention pay, or make non-committal empty promises. Contracts should not be avoided – love them, they are your best friend. The law only goes so far in protecting your rights. Watermarks are free, lawyers are not.

Eventing Photo by Vanessa Hughes of Lady Photographic

Eventing Photo by Vanessa Hughes of Lady Photographic

If you work for free don’t be surprised when they are not willing to pay you in the future. Network like your life depends on it. Try to avoid chimping, or constantly looking down at your camera after every shot, in that split second of distraction you can miss valuable shots. Take advantage of other photographers’ experience – watch what they do and when they move but find your own voice and vision.

Finally a word of caution for those looking to get into the business. You are not the first and most definitely will not be the last to be seen as an easy target. Young photographers seeking to make a name for themselves, willing to work for next to nothing, are unfortunately a dime a dozen. There’s absolutely no shame in being in that group. I was once among you. We all have to start somewhere.

The shame comes from those businesses, mainly magazines, who knowingly repeatedly take advantage. Many do so under the guise of “internships.” Most don’t realize those internships are actually illegal. If an intern produces video, images, writing or any media (often using their own equipment) and they are not overseen by a professional and given an education of equal or greater value they legally must be paid minimum wage. Essentially many of these businesses/magazines profit from the hard work of “interns” year after year by dangling the possibility of paid work that artificially doesn’t exist. While they are legally obligated to make those positions available to paid employees, they won’t. These businesses are the single biggest plague on the industry today and why so many can’t make a decent living when there is plenty of work to go around.

“The DOL has articulated six key factors that must be met in order to avoid having a “trainee” classified as employee. The factors are:

The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment;
The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern;
The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff;
The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded;
The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and
The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.”

Favorite horse memory?
I have two favorite horse memories I use to keep myself going. The first was from when I was twelve years old and rode for the very first time. I was given an hour lesson for my birthday. I rode a beautiful chestnut mare with a heart of gold and a whole lot of patience for my squirrely little self. I don’t remember much from that one ride but the impact of that day has kept with me since. I think that is the power of horses. You can spend just five minutes or your whole life with them but once they give you a piece of their heart you never forget it.

The second was my first time stepping onto a cross country course and witnessing eventing. At the time I never could have imagined such a sport existed. It was thrilling. I was more than a little nervous to walk out on the course the first time, worried I would do something stupid and get myself or someone else hurt. Eventually I grew accustomed to anticipating the horses and walking the course felt natural. Now a cross country course feels like a second home. I have gone to many events and various equine sports since but in my eyes none compares to eventing. It also doesn’t hurt that eventers tend to be my kind of crazy, I love the whole lot them.

Future goals?
I graduated from UCLA this past June so my first goal is trying to keep a steady flow of work. Right now I am also working with some of the biggest equestrian Instagram accounts here in California to band together to form a kind of collective for collaboration and content creation. I am excited to be working with some seriously amazing women in the coming weeks and looking forward to seeing where that goes. I also like to follow a lot of social media experts online and many of them are pointing towards video integration in social media growing by as much as 2/3s in the next two years so I am focusing more on motion graphics and video production work this year.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
There are so many possibilities. Everyday is a new day, a new challenge. Sure sometimes the pay could be better but in a way that’s part of the game and I love it.

I came into the field with what some consider a disadvantage. I knew absolutely nothing about horses. Growing up the money for horses and lessons, we just didn’t have it.  Back then I was too young for anyone to consider me as a working student. Like many kids facing that wall I gave up, thinking that dream was over for good. It wasn’t until college that fate intervened and one day a wayward hobbyist photographer stumbled upon a showjumping event that would change everything.

I do what I do for the pure joy of it because there are no free rides. Many times I have been told I don’t belong, but even if I don’t have the opportunity to ride(yet) I can still be part of the story. I belong here.

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Profile On: Michelle Charman, Forelock Books

Michelle is a publisher for Forelock Books.  She has kindly taken the time to answer some questions about what she does.

Michelle Charman of Forelock Books

Michelle Charman of Forelock Books

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
With regard to my job, I have little contact with horses, but I spend at least 2 days a week at horse events, meeting equestrian readers and riders. My job also allows me to spend more time with my own horse. I can take advantage of good light and weather conditions to nip out for a ride and can easily work lessons, farrier and vet visits into my schedule.

Forelock Books

Forelock Books

What is it exactly that you do?
I look for the best pony and equestrian-led stories.  Based on what I hear and am told by riders I decide which stories to publish. I then produce, promote and sell these books at pony club and horse events around the country.

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
It’s certainly possible and that’s what I aim to do, however the set up costs for starting your own publishing business are very high and returns are low, unless you can sell thousands of copies. Finding your market and gaining a reader’s trust takes time.

(No one wants to spend precious time reading what could turn out to be a poor story and that’s why being a rider and horse enthusiast as well as a publisher is so important).

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
Setting up your own publishing company is expensive and risky, but we like to use editors with some equine knowledge, preferably someone who grew up dreaming of or owning their own pony. Our editors work free-lance on a whole range of equestrian books, magazines and websites.  This is a great way of earning a living while being involved in the equine business and having the flexibility to enjoy being a horse-owner.

Checking out Forelock Books

Checking out Forelock Books

Favourite horse memory?
Oooh I have so many, but my favourite memories are of school holidays when I was 10-12yrs old.

Days spent with my best friend and our ponies, riding across the mountains and along the beaches of Wales.  Then, returning home, exhausted and looking forward to sleep so I could relive the day’s ride.

Future goals?
My future goal is to get Forelock Books recognised worldwide, so that we can continue publishing the very best horse and pony stories to inspire young riders and to remind older riders and horse enthusiasts of the magic ponies bring.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
Reading, riding and talking to young pony-lovers – seeing the gleam in their eyes and knowing where that comes from.

Profile On: Kate Majors, Horsi

I recently wrote about Horsi, an online social networking site for horse owners and businesses in Australia.  Kate Majors, the founder had kindly answered some questions about what she does.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
I spend time with my daughter’s two ponies every day.  Actually the highlight of my day is to see their happy faces waiting patiently in their stable for breakfast each morning. I’m also lucky enough to indulge my passion of horses through Horsi each and every day. Seeing the stories of riders and horses which are being added to the site on a daily basis warms my heart.

What is it exactly that you do?
I spend my days designing and implementing new ideas for Horsi, to make it the best social networking site for horse lovers in Australia. We have big plans for the future of Horsi and it takes considerable time to guide and expand the business.

There is no point doing what we are doing without delivering our users the best possible experience.  So I also spend time gaining information from people who are using the site and then communicating with our development team to give our users exactly what they want.

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
It is definitely possible to make a good income from website development or online publishing, but most people “test the waters” while still working in a full-time job. The trick is to find a niche market and to ensure you’re creating something that people really want.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
My background, which has led me to founding Horsi, is a combination of my undying passion for horses and my considerable internet business experience. In my pre-business life I rode showjumping horses at world cup level and represented Australia, which has given me an understanding of the dedication and the level of passion people have for their horses and our sport.

Favourite horse memory?
My favourite horse memory would be spending time with my golden oldie showjumping horses, Jimmy and Vita in their retirement. They won many ribbons, but having them enjoy their golden years being kept in the manner they deserved, makes me smile every time I think about them.

Horsi Founder, Kate Majors and her Family

Horsi Founder, Kate Majors and her Family

Future goals?
My goal for Horsi, is to showcase equestrian sport in Australia. We have so many wonderful horses and riders and they deserve to be given the spotlight. We will continue to work tirelessly to deliver a first class social networking site to promote our sport.

Who makes up the team at Horsi?
We have a wonderful team of people at Horsi. Jade wears many hats, which includes marketing, social communications, supporting our Horsi Ambassador’s and writing. Steve (aka Husband) manages our accounts and assists in future planning, Joanne updates Horsi with new content. Shoaib is our Graphic Designer and then we also have a team of developers working continuously on improving Horsi.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
I believe the best thing about our sport is that men and women of all ages can enjoy it. People can ride at 3 or 73.  It’s very special to to be able to participate in your chosen sport for such a large part of your life.

Profile On: Claire Galer, Derriere Equestrian

Claire Galer of Derriere Equestrian was kind enough to answer some questions about her profession.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
The majority of the week! My husband is an Equine Veterinary Surgeon & I am an Equine Physiotherapist, come Equine Lingerie Entrepreneur! Our home is the base for our Equine Veterinary Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre, we therefore live, eat & breath horses.

Our children have ponies, my husband rides his beautiful Warmblood Duke and I compete at Affiliated Dressage when time permits. However with the success & growth of Derriere Equestrian, I have temporarily hung up the competition boots!

Claire Galer of Derriere Equestrian

Claire Galer of Derriere Equestrian

What is it exactly that you do?
Having worked my entire career with horses as both Equine Nutritionist and Equine Physiotherapists, spanning 25 years, I now find my career has taken a different turn. Working with riders for many years, assessing rider performance, symmetry and much more brought about the advent of Derriere Equestrian.

Seeing a gap in the market globally for quality, effective, attractive underwear for horse riders was the first step. Development, design and bringing to market our product range was the next step. My position now and day to day work life sees me working as Managing Director of our International Equestrian Underwear Business and maintaining my role managing the Veterinary Clinic and HR within the team.

Day to day business life encompasses everything from: product development, design, figures, sales, marketing and leading our team forward to a successful future, with continued growth across the world. The work is primarily office based, however also requires travel to our production and design teams in Italy and Tunisia, supporting our retailers through staff training and exhibitions support. Our focus to our trade buyers sees the business exhibit at many International Trade Exhibitions, our key events being: SPOGA Horse twice a year at Koelnmesse in Cologne, Germany, BETA International in the UK and AETA Trade Show in the USA. So business does involve a great deal of European and International travel.

Claire Galer, Derriere Equestrian

Claire Galer, Derriere Equestrian

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
Yes without a doubt, Derriere Equestrian is more than full time and has a rapidly growing international team. We have a small office based team here in the UK at our HQ, a growing workforce through subcontracted work and Team Agents working with us in all European Countries and further afield Internationally.

There certainly are not enough hours in the day! After 2 years in design, prototyping and performance testing, we are delighted to be launching our Equestrians Sports Bra “The DE Sportief” at SPOGA Horse 4th – 6th September, the demand is high and we see our team expansion will continue as a result of this, so a busy launch period ahead.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
My career has followed a strong medical , veterinary and anatomical background; training as a Registered General Nurse, followed by studying for and graduating from my BSc(Hons) Equine Science Degree in 1997, then later completing my physio training.

Having worked for International Feed Company Dodson & Horrell for the foundations of my career, I was given a great taste for business, sales and marketing. My family are a strong business minded family, with many driven entrepreneurs! My mother worked as a dress designer for her entire career, so this has been a huge help to bring the creativity to the forefront with the Derriere Equestrian project.

Favourite horse memory?
At the age of 8 my family moved from Belfast in Northern Ireland to the countryside of Herefordshire, within a week our local farmer appeared down the drive leading a small chestnut pony on the end of some bailer twine. He handed said pony “Rosie” to my father and said “You now live in the country and should have a pony” This is where it all started and that memory will stay with me forever.

Claire Galer of Derriere Equestrian

Claire Galer of Derriere Equestrian

Future goals?
Future business goals are to see Derriere Equestrian continue to grow and support riders with our world leading Equestrian Apparel Garments. Our product range is expanding, our retailers growth has been so accelerated, the work is so rewarding. Our product range is set to roll out across all sporting disciplines.  I am just so proud to have developed such a fantastic business model. On a personal level, future goals are many! High on the priority list is: time with my beautiful family and watching my children grow to live happy, successful, content lives.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
Achieving satisfaction in my work to support riders around the world, seeing the harmony between every horse and rider we work with #TwoHearts.  Also, having designed and brought to market a revolutionary, innovative product that has changed so many riders’ lives for the better.

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Profile On: Jane and Stuart Myers, Equiculture

Jane Myers was kind enough to answer some questions about the work that she and Stuart carry out with Equiculture.  Check out their answers!

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
All of our working week is related to horses, we live and breath horses every day, although we no longer own horses as we are travelling, delivering our talks around the world.

What is it exactly that you do?
We (Equiculture) teach horse owners about sustainable horsekeeping practices (I was one of the speakers at The Sustainable Equine Conference at Nottingham Trent University recently for example). We now work between Australia and the UK, I spend about four months in Australia and Stuart six months.

Equiculture Promotes Sustainable Horse Keeping

Equiculture Promotes Sustainable Horse Keeping

We provide a one day or half day talk on the subject of sustainable, environmentally friendly horse/lan.d management. This talk gives participants up to date facts about some of the most important issues of our time. This talk encompasses the latest information about sustainability, soil loss, clean water etc. but also includes the latest information about equine obesity management (particularly in relation to pasture).

I (Jane) also coach rider biomechanics, you can find out more about that on www.horseridersmechanic.com.

Jane Myers of Equiculture

Jane Myers of Equiculture

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
It is difficult – but possible. We have had to sacrifice many things, but we love the flexibility of our work. If we had family ties, such as children, it would be much more difficult.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
I have an MSc Equine Science ( I specialised in Grazing Behaviour) and Stuart is a people person (he has a degree in Youth Work and he worked in that field for many years before working for our own business – Equiculture). Our combined equine and human qualifications and experience has allowed us to develop our unique business.

Favourite horse memory?
I have so many… riding on the beach is one.

Future goals?
To get our message out to more people – on a TV show would be good!

Best thing about your sport/profession?
It allows women to get out and do things that they might not otherwise.

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Profile On: Belinda Bailey, Equestrian Coach

Belinda Bailey is involved in the equine education industry in a few different areas.  She teachers others in all of these facets.  She has kindly taken the time to answer some questions about her horse related career.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
30 – 40 hours a week

Belinda Bailey, Equestrian Coach

Belinda Bailey, Equestrian Coach

What is it exactly that you do?
I am an Equestrian Coach and Coach Educator.  I also work as a part time TAFE Teacher of Equine and Agriculture Courses

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
Yes it is definitely possible to make a comfortable living in the Equine Industry.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
Vast riding and competition experience and success to a National and International level in Eventing, with success in many other sports including, dressage, camp drafting, polocrosse, endurance riding and showjumping.

Level, and study and completion of Coach Qualifications, and other National Qualifications in the Equestrian, Risk and Safety and Assessing areas.

Favourite horse memory?
Too many favourite memories with wonderful horses over the years to point one single memory out.  It would be unfair to the rest.

Future goals?
Goals are to deliver quality education and provide a positive environment for learning.  Another is to enable people to be successful in the Equine Industry.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
The best things about the Horse Industry is that it is a very healthy environment requiring quite a lot of exercise.  Also, you meet some fantastic people and develop life long partnerships with one of the nicest animals on earth.

“The horse, with beauty unsurpassed, strength immeasurable and grace unlike any other, still remains humble enough to carry a man upon his back.” – Amber Senti

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Profile On: Trisha Dingle, Race2Ring Equine Rehab

Trisha Dingle of Race2Ring Equine Rehab & Egyptian Rose Sport Horses was kind enough to answer some questions about her profession.  Read below for her answers!  Also, if you take a look at the website, volunteering is a possibility and educational days are held.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
Nearly my entire day is equine related – I’d say overall a minimum of 75%, closer to 90% of my week is horse related

What is it exactly that you do?
I am a professional horse trainer. I manage a 501c-3 non-profit equine rescue and rehabilitation facility. In addition I keep a small personal show string of Arabian sport horses.

Race2Ring Equine Rehab

Race2Ring Equine Rehab

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
Yes it is, but it takes a lot of work and thinking outside of the box. In order to maintain my personal horses I also work as a consultant for a health and nutritional company.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
No matter when you start working with horses, one should spend as much time learning all aspects of equine care and training. I continue to take riding lessons with other professionals.  And I attend as many educational opportunities as I can on all aspects of equine care. Ideally you should spend time in a quality working student program in the breed/discipline you prefer.

There are some wonderful equestrian schools for post high-school education, however one must be cautious to be open to additional learning as there are so many advances in equine care and management that aren’t always covered in school. It is highly advisable to take business and management courses as well.

Favourite horse memory?
Too many to pick one… from my very first pony who ignited my love of horses, to the birth of my long awaited upper level prospect, to winning a national title with my stallion after a long battle with his health, to helping countless “throwaway horses” find their forever homes with people who love them.

Race2Ring Equine Rehab

Race2Ring Equine Rehab

Future goals?
To help even more forgotten horses have a new lease on life; to educate the average horse owner on proper horse management and care; to continue to train my personal horses to the highest level of their sport while maintaining and strengthening the bonds and connection we already share; to prove to the general public that show ring success CAN be achieved without resorting to drugs or harsh training methods.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
Waking up every day to a job I love!

Profile On: Rachel Annan, Equine Industry Trainer

Rachel Annan is an equine industry trainer with the College of Agriculture, Food and Rural Enterprise (CAFRE).  She has kindly taken the time to answer some questions about her horse related profession and experience.  Find out more about being an equine industry trainer below.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
My entire working week is related to horses in some way or another.  Or more precisely, all my work is related to training and educating people about horses.  I also exercise Racehorses in my spare time!

What is it exactly that you do?
Equine Industry Training.  I educate people who work in the equine industry in Northern Ireland about horses, equine business, Health & Safety, etc. We run seminars, evening courses and conferences.

Equine Industry Training

Equine Industry Training

I am also involved with Knowledge and Technology Transfer work in the equine Industry.  This is to enhance equine welfare, business profitability and environmental impact for equine businesses in Northern Ireland, through Technology and improved Knowledge.

Equine Industry Trainer: Rachel Annan

Equine Industry Trainer: Rachel Annan

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
Yes. I’m doing it!

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
I have an Equine Managemnet Degree, Level 3 NVQ in Racehorse Care and professional marketing qualifications. I also have extensive experience in the Racing industry throughout the world.

Favourite horse memory?
Winning races on Eglish – A small racehorse with a big heart!

Future goals?
Continue to expand my experience in the industry.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
The people in the equine industry!

“In the steady gaze of the horse shines a silent eloquence that speaks of love and loyalty, strength and courage. It is the window that reveals to us how willing is his spirit, how generous his heart.” – Author Unknown

Profile On: Ann Pearce, Equine Agent

Ann Pearce is an equine agent, researching the right horse for customers to buy. She was kind enough to answer some questions about this work she currently does part time.

How much of your day/week is related to horses?
I would guess that my day is between 50 and 60% horse related, either working for someone else freelance, being with my own semi retired hobby horse and brood mares or teaching my three year old daughter on the lead rein.

Equine Agent: Could you help Others find their Dream Horse?

Equine Agent: Could you help Others find their Dream Horse?

Then in the evening it’s hours of searching through the internet for the ideal horse/ponies as an equine agent to my customers. Usually from the UK and USA looking to come over here to Germany but also I have some regular customers from Sweden.

What is it exactly that you do?
I help people find their perfect equine partner. I simply use my contacts to find as many suitable horses as possible. I then arrange videos, hotels, transport and appointments to come and try them, help correspond with vets and arrange transport and quarantine if required. I can even book restaurants and arrange nights out. The main aim is to not only find my customers the perfect horse but make the whole experience as fun and stress free as possible.

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
I do know some agents who do this full time and manage to make a living out of it. They usually work for one yard and get their commission from that yard. I work totally independently. Not tied to any yard or seller, I work for the buyer.

For me it just isn’t possible to do this full time. I find that the amount of time I actually put in finding horses and reputable yards/sellers is just too huge. I would rather have one or two customers a month who really know what they need in a horse that I can really commit to, rather than one or two a week, just rushed through. Also being a single mother to a perpetually energetic three year old means that at this point in time I could not work as an independent agent full time.

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
I think the general steps taken to be employed in such a role apart from having experience in the horse world and a good basic knowledge of law regarding sales, is to be friendly and approachable. People want to work with someone who takes the role seriously and has an excellent reputation. Word of mouth has always been my favourite form of advertising.

Favourite horse memory?
My favourite horse memory is probably hunting as a child. Back in the days when I knew no fear.

Future goals?
My future goals are two fold. I have just moved to France and my main business goal is to build up a great network here while continuing to source horses and work with people in Germany. As for my personal goals I would love to get back to my original passion and what first brought me to Germany almost 10 years ago, breeding. I have a couple of very special mares at the moment and hope to have a few dressage foals on the ground in the next 18 months either for private sale or auction.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
The best thing about my profession is the people and horses I get to meet. Being based in Warendorf for the last 7 years has been a truly amazing experience. There are just so many talented people in this town. Everyday you can learn something new.

I also love it when people send me pictures and updates of the horses I have helped them to find. That’s a great feeling.  Ann can be contacted via ann1.pearce@web.de

Profile On: Katherine Bloomquist, Equine Law

Katherine Bloomquist practices law and focuses on the niche area of equine law.  She was kind enough to answer some questions here on Equus Education about Bloomquist Law and in what way her work relates to horses!

Ms. Bloomquist is recognized as a leader in animal law and equine law. She is a frequent speaker at the National Equine Law Conference in Kentucky, the Equine Law Conference in California, and is regularly published on this subject.

What is it exactly that you do?
I am an equine lawyer. I handle matters and cases involving horses. On the corporate side I create entities for horse businesses and draft contracts such as releases, boarding, breeding, purchase and sale, etc. I also handle land use ( zoning and feedlot and Conditional use permits) as well as litigation involving horses!

In this field of work, is it possible to be a full time professional and earning a liveable income?
Yes

Katherine Bloomquist; Equine Law

Katherine Bloomquist; Equine Law

What are the general steps taken to be employed in such a role?
I completed 4 years of college and 3 years of law school. Thereafter I developed a focus in equine law!

Favourite horse memory?
Competing at Morven Park at a preliminary horse trial one star – long format!

Future goals?
I much enjoy how I continue to learn about the nuances of the differences of the various sport horses and the people in those different disciplines.

Best thing about your sport/profession?
Barn visits – being out of the office and at a horse farm to see my clients do their thing!

“His is a power enhanced by pride, a courage heightened by challenge. His is a swiftness intensified by strength, a majesty magnified by grace. His is a timeless beauty touched with gentleness, a spirit that calls our hearts to dream.” – Author Unknown

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