Link to Equus Education!
Save the below image and link it to http://equus-blog.com/ :)
Equine Passive Streams Course by Equus Education
Breeding the Mare Course by Equus Education
Equine Resources at TeachinaBox

Affiliate Parntner

Living Fence Lines

So a friend Cait sent me an interesting link on Facebook the other day. It was about having live fences – plants that can be used as natural barriers.  Many will plant along a fence line, but perhaps planting as a fence line should be considered?

A tree Windbreak Along a Fence Line

I loved this idea when I saw it in action in Ireland at the National Stud but haven’t given it a lot of thought since then, or even considered it’s benefits. To me, it had appeal because:

  • of the look (who doesn’t like green?)
  • the fact that it is a sturdy wind break
  • and is highly visible

There are a lot of other benefits to having living fences however. I’ve been entertaining the idea of tagasaste hedges on my future property in between fence lines, but am now wondering if this in itself can be the fence.  Obviously growing plants can take time, they can die off and they can appeal to the tastebuds of the inhabitants of the paddock!

However, they can help out with the local eco system if indigenous plants are used, they may be more cost effective and can be regenerated through growing from seeds.

“Set your sights after the last fence.” – author unknown

5 Responses to “Living Fence Lines”

  • Geof:

    As a distributor of specialised horse fence I must endorse Christine’s comments above. In particular the need for high visibility of boundaries. There is ample scientific evidence that Horses tend towards far sightedness, as such they are likely to identify that there are near a fence, not so much by seeing the rail itself but in seeing landmarks nearby to the other side of the fence. There is anecdotal evidence that large bushes and shrubs over the fence (likewise other structures like barns and other outbuilingdetc…) may indeed trigger horses to be aware that the fence is near, well before they actually focus on the fence itself.

    When planning your fencing for horses it is always good to make use of existing landmarks, and like suggested above plant a few additional ones.

    For more information on safe horse fencing see http://www.fencing4horses.com.au

  • […] Good fences can be both formal and informal (natural boundaries, rows of shrubs and walls) but need to be well built and carefully planned.  Always remember a good fence is always a sturdy and safe horse fence.  Let’s not turn our properties into cages, remember fencing should complement a property and not dominate a properties look.  With the right materials safe horse fencing can also be attractive horse fencing.  Work some trees and shrubs into the design and soften the appearance and create some value.  For some further reading see this useful blog Equos Blog – Living Fences. […]

  • […] Many horse property owners revert to square lines and worry unnecessarily about losing space when tight areas are restricted.  In practice however the best property plans avoid tight areas altogether and when this can’t be achieved make use of fenced of areas for beautification with trees or shrubs and small gardens.  Certainly the most valuable properties are attractive and the most attractive properties are not merely a series of plain square yards, so get creative.  Consider using “living boundaries” in addition to or even in substitution of some formal fencing.  Incorporating the right shrubs and trees into your paddock design can lift the look of the horse property significantly without sacrificing significant space, safety or your day to day efficiency.  For more information on the use of natural boundaries you might like to read this blog Equos – Living Boundaries. […]

  • […] Many horse property owners revert to square lines and worry unnecessarily about losing space when tight areas are restricted.  In practice however the best property plans avoid tight areas altogether and when this can’t be achieved make use of fenced of areas for beautification with trees or shrubs and small gardens.  Certainly the most valuable properties are attractive and the most attractive properties are not merely a series of plain square yards, so get creative.  Consider using “living boundaries” in addition to or even in substitution of some formal fencing.  Incorporating the right shrubs and trees into your paddock design can lift the look of the horse property significantly without sacrificing significant space, safety or your day to day efficiency.  For more information on the use of natural boundaries you might like to read this blog Equos – Living Boundaries. […]

  • […] For further ideas and thoughts on using living boundaries see Equos Blog – Living Fence lines. […]

Leave a Reply

Bad Behavior has blocked 575 access attempts in the last 7 days.